From the Book of Eminent Burgesses of Dundee 1513 to 1885.

Colin Campbell, Pastor of Dundee - 19th October 1619

 

WHICH DAY MAGISTER COLIN CAMPBELL, PASTOR OF THE CHURCH OF DUNDEE, IS ADDED TO THE NUMBER OF THE BURGESSES AND BRETHREN OF THE GUILD IN THE SAID BURGH, FOR HIS PUBLIC SERVICES.

COLIN CAMPBELL, minister of the Third Charge in Dundee, was born in 1577, and studied at St Andrews University, where he took his degree in 1597. He was placed as minister of Kettins, in the Presbytery of Meigle, about 1604, and remained there until he was transferred to Dundee, in 1617, as successor to Magister WILLIAM WEDDERBURN (vide page 102). His name appears associated with those of ANDREW MELVILLE, PATRICK SIMSON, JAMES MELVILLE, JOHN ROW, and other Presbyterian leaders, in the famous Protestation against the establishment of Episcopacy, which was presented to the Parliament at Perth, on 1st July, 1606. His opinions upon this matter, like that of many of his brethren, must afterwards have changed, as he was one of those nominated in the High Commission issued by the KING, on 15th June, 1620, for the purpose of erecting an Ecclesiastical Court, where offences against church discipline might be summarily dealt with. Regarding this Commission, CALDERWOOD writes:

"The true intent was to force ministers and other professors to practise the Five Articles, and to establish the tyrannous usurpation of Bishops" (Hist. of the Kirk, Wodrow edition, Vol. VII, p. 384).

At a later date (21st October, 16") he was a member of the Commission for the Maintenance of Church Discipline, and must therefore have possessed the confidence both of the KING (CHARLES I.) and of the Assembly.


In the Fasti Ecelesiae Scoticana, Vol. III., p. 694, it is stated that COLIN CAMPBELL "had for stipend and house maill in 1622 ixc merks," but from the entry in the Minutes of the Town Council it is apparent that this is an error. When he was admitted to the Third Charge the Council agreed to pay him " the soum of aucht hundred merks yearly in name of stipend, by and attour his house maill." In 1624, after he had been seven years in the place, the Council granted him an increase "yearly and ilk year during the time of his serving the cure, ane hundred and ten merks in augmentation of the aucht hundred payit him of before, and of his house maill, making in the whole the sum of ane thousand merks." These payments are verified by the entries in the Kirkmaster's accounts.


COLIN CAMPBELL died on 13th June, 1638, and was buried in the South Church, where his memorial stone was found in fragments after the destruction of the Churches by fire, in 1841.
He estimated his haill buikis to be worth iic lib., utencils, &c., iiixxvi lib. xiii s iiij d, Frie geir, ile lib., xiii s. iiij d, and left in legacie to the poore of the Burgh xl merks" (Fasti Ecelesiae Scoticanae). His wife, MARGARET HAY, survived him, and was in a position to lend money to the Town when a levy was made, in 1644, to provide men to send against the MARQUESS OF HUNTLY and the insurgents who had joined with him. The three sons of COLIN CAMPBELL were all engaged in the ministry JAMES being minister of St. Madoes, DAVID, of Menmuir, and JOHN, of Tealing.