From the Book of Eminent Burgesses of Dundee 1513 to 1885.

Patrick, Lord Gray - 13th January 1589

 

WHICH DAY PATRICK, LORD GRAY, IS ADDED TO THE NUMBER OF THE BURGESSES OF DUNDEE, BY REASON OF THE PRIVILEGE OF His FATHER, THE LATE PATRICK, LORD GRAY; AND ALSO, BECAUSE OF HIS MANY SERVICES TO THE COMMONWEAL OF THE BURGH OF DUNDEE, THE FREEDOM OF THE SAID BURGH IS GIVEN TO HIM.

PATRICK, sixth BARON GRAY of Gray, was the grandson of GILBERT GRAY of Buttergask, who was enrolled as a Burgess on 3rd October, 1513 [page 11]. The present entry implies that his father, PATRICK, fifth BARON GRAY, also enjoyed that privilege, though no record of his admission has been preserved. The sixth BARON GRAY was closely connected with Dundee, not only through his ancestor, LORD GRAY, Provost of the Burgh, in 1513 [page 9], but also through his mother, who was a daughter of JAMES LORD OGILVY of Airlie. His marriage with BARBARA, fourth daughter Of WILLIAM, LORD RUTHVEN, made him an associate with the party of the latter, and linked him with several of the most powerful families in the Scottish nobility. After his accession to the estate and title, on the death of his father in 1582, he was suspected of favouring the Jesuits, but the terms of his oath as a Burgess of Dundee, taken seven years afterwards, would preclude all support of Romanism. Besides the two sons mentioned here, LORD GRAY had another son, ANDREW, whose name appears in the Burgess Roll under date 28th October, 1601 ; whilst his eldest son and successor was that PATRICK, MASTER OF GRAY, afterwards seventh BARON GRAY, who appears in history as a miracle of political intrigue and duplicity. It was the latter who was sent as ambassador to the Court of England to petition for the release of QUEEN MARY, but who used his position for the purpose of encompassing the destruction of that unfortunate captive.
From a curious entry in the book it appears that a Commission was issued by the Privy Council in 1596, ordering the PROVOST and BAILIES of Dundee to besiege and capture "the houses of Huntlie, Fowlis, and [Broughty ?], belonging to PATRIK, LORD GRAY, and PATRIK, MASTER OF GRAY," who were then charged with treason ; but the Commission was afterwards suspended. A still more mournful entry is that which occurs in the on 3rd April, 1607, showing that PATRICK, LORD GRAY, had 'havelie complenit' to the KING that his son, the MASTER OF GRAY, had not only brought his wife and family into the House of Gray, "consuming thairby all that mean portioun that he had reservit for his awne mantenance," and violently taken possession of the father's revenue, but was also "preising verie unnaturallie to accelerat his faderis gray hairis to the grave with sorow," by removing all his "auld servandis and domesticques," and bringing in others "whose service noway gevis the auld man ony contentment." The KING ordered that the MASTER should be removed from the House of Gray, but shortly afterwards (1609) the old LORD GRAY expired.